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Tuesday, 11 February 2020

Decoupling: de-radicalisation (6)

Some days ago, I noticed this heading in an article from The National: "The last two attacks in London indicate UK's approach to de-radicalisation is failing". I just wondered: is de-radicalisation even an option? Radicalisation is similar to having extreme beliefs. Convicting extreme believers to jail time is more likely to increase having extreme beliefs and thus radicalisation.

In accordance with my concept of Faith, Beliefs & Willpower (my blogs), there is only one solution to de-radicalisation: a crisis of faith (eg, NY Mag-2006, my 2019 blog).

A crisis of faith starts with having doubts. When such doubts become insurmountable then the fear of having made a mistake should emerge.

Fear will create a Vacuum in which new beliefs should find fertile ground.

Essentially, de-radicalisation is another example of decoupling and subsequent coupling.

In my view, there is only one set of new beliefs that may find fertile ground: Love (eg, people, planet, peace, prosperity).

I would question the (true) intentions of the new believer in case of accepting new beliefs other than Love. A decoupling and subsequent coupling, following a crisis of faith, feels like a reset to default factory settings. In case of humans, this would be at birth. Hence, Love as new belief.

Finding new fertile ground may not provide a (permanent) solution if and when the old fertile ground is still around (eg, low self-esteem, racism, unemployment, victim role). This problem is similar with the relapse rate of criminals (a.k.a. recidivism) and/or with alcohol and drug abuse.

Similarly, individual radicalisation seems consistent with global radicalisation. Hence, my 2019 blog: A global crisis of faith. Any attempt for de-radicalisation seems futile in a radicalising world. Global coupling towards new beliefs will only happen once we have reached the Vacuum.

“Ideology without grievances doesn't resonate. Grievances without ideology aren't acted upon.” A quote from a 2018 radicalization speech at Ryerson University by Mubin Shaikh, "a leading Canadian counter-terrorism expert".

You Get What You Give (1998) by The New Radicals

Don't give up, you've got a reason to live 
Can't forget, we only get what we give


Note: all markings (bolditalicunderlining) by LO unless stated otherwise.

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